FAQ-South Pacific – Samoa

What you need to know

Information and Facts

Samoa has many lush green valleys, cascading waterfalls dropping into rivers, rugged volcanic mountain peaks, and a variety of white sandy beaches sure to lure you with their charm and serenity!  Enjoy Samoa’s coastline is with its sparkling white sand beaches that stretch and go on for miles as well as the coastline’s walls of sheer cliffs dropping straight into the Pacific Ocean.  With Samoa’s many picturesque beaches, coastlines and natural beauty, it’s the culture and people that complete the magic of the Samoan islands with their friendly welcoming vibe.  

Samoa: Facts & Information

Weather

The temperature in Samoa averages 30 degrees celsius and the ocean is a warm 25 degrees. Dry season runs from May – October, while the wet season is from November to April.

Safety

Samoa is a generally a safe place to travel. Most resorts / fales have 24 hour security. The people of Samoa are friendly and happy to share their culture. With all travel at home or away, you should observe the same precautions with your personal safety and possessions. Take copies of your important documents and keep them separate from the originals.

Vaccinations

WHO recommends travellers be up to date with their Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, typhoid, yellow fever, & rabies. In general, prior to departure for any vacation, it’s always best to speak with your physician.

Currency & Customs

The currency of Samoa is The Samoan Tala. Visitors to Samoa are not required to have an entry permit for stays of less than 60 days. You must have a return (or onward) ticket and your passport must be valid for more than 6 months at the time of your entry into Samoa.

Electricity

Samoa uses 240V/AC 50 cycles, but can be converted to 100 volts in most hotels. Powerpoints can accept three pronged plugs as used in Australia and NZ.

Language

English is widely spoken however, it’s useful to know a few Samoan words:

Hello – “Talofa”
Please – “Fa’amolemole
Thank You – “Fa’afetai”
Goodbye – “Tofa”