FAQ-South Pacific-Tahiti-French Polynesia

What you need to know

Information and Facts

The heart of the South Pacific, Tahiti is the largest of the French Polynesian islands. Tahiti is dominated by 3 extinct volcanos, and split up into 2 parts, Tahiti Nui & the smaller Tahiti Iti. Tahiti has unreal sunsets, clear oceans and white sandy beaches making it the ultimate relaxing vacation. Speak to a destination specialists and get started on your next adventure to the South Pacific.

Tahiti / French Polynesia: Facts & Information

Weather

French Polynesia is in a moderate tropical region with a climate offering sunny, pleasant days and an average yearly air and water temperature of 27C. Summer is from November through April and the temperatures are slightly warmer and more humid. Winter is from May through October and the temperatures are slightly cooler and dryer.

Safety

The islands of French Polynesia are generally a safe destination for travel. With common-sense, you can safely enjoy your visit. However, as with all travel at home or away, you should observe the same precautions with your personal safety and possessions.

Vaccinations

WHO recommends travellers be up to date with their Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B & Typhoid Fever. In general, prior to departure for any vacation, it’s always best to speak with your physician.

Currency & Customs

Tahiti’s currency is the French Pacific Franc (XPF). Most credit cards are readily accepted in all tourist areas. Tipping is not customary, with the exception of tour leaders. Travelers with 10, 000 Euros, in cash or travelers cheques, will need to declare the total sum to the relevant customs officials. All gold, except for personal jewellery, over 500grams will need to be declared.

Electricity

Hotels use either 110 or 220 volts, depending on the location. Power outlets for shavers are provided in most hotels and a converter/adapter is often required for appliances you bring, including computers. Most of the hotels use a European style plug.

Language

French and Tahitian are the official languages of French Polynesia. English is spoken and understood in most hotels, restaurants and shops.